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PeaceGame Venezuela: Pathways to Peace

A year after Juan Guaidó took the presidential oath, nearly sixty countries now recognize the interim government as the legitimate representative of the Venezuelan people. Still, the Maduro regime remains in power, further threatening the country and the world every day. As Venezuela becomes increasingly engulfed in internal strife, the international community must prepare for the most dire scenarios. What would be the reverberations of complete state collapse? How might various stakeholders— from Venezuelan actors to regional neighbors to Russia or armed groups—respond?

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Tue, Feb 18, 2020

#AlertaVenezuela: February 18, 2020

A group of Twitter accounts linked to Venezuelan right-wing movements, such as Rumbo Libertad and Derecha Ciudadana, pushed hashtags not only against Nicolás Maduro but also against Juan Guaidó on Twitter. In some tweets, the group asked for military intervention and misleadingly claimed that Guaidó supported the Maduro regime.

#AlertaVenezuela by Atlantic Council's DFRLab

Disinformation Venezuela

Tue, Feb 18, 2020

Spain’s position on Venezuela jeopardizes unified fight for democracy

Support shown to the Maduro regime on ideological grounds serves to fuel further polarization, not only in Venezuela, but around the world. Whatever the nature of the relationship between the Maduro regime and Podemos, or ideological commonalities between the two, lending diplomatic support for Maduro is commending a dictatorship.

New Atlanticist by Cristina Guevara

Democratic Transitions Southern & Southeastern Europe
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Tue, Feb 11, 2020

#AlertaVenezuela: February 11, 2020

Rumors claiming that Juan Guaidó had given Donald Trump permission to lead a military intervention in Venezuela started to circulate while Guaidó was on an international tour to Europe and the Western Hemisphere. The claims amassed substantial engagement on social media, including a YouTube video that received more than 100,000 views.

#AlertaVenezuela by Atlantic Council's DFRLab

Disinformation Venezuela

Tue, Feb 4, 2020

What Trump’s State of the Union means for US foreign policy

US President Donald J. Trump used his third State of the Union address to argue that his administration has “launched the great American comeback” through its economic policies and tough international stances. In a speech that focused heavily on domestic issues, his discussion of foreign policy mainly highlighted what he believed to be his major foreign policy successes, rather than announcements of new plans.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

China Energy & Environment
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Tue, Feb 4, 2020

#AlertaVenezuela: February 4, 2020

A Twitter network previously reported by the DFRLab used random text, including snippets of poems, song lyrics, articles, and Wikipedia entries, to amplify anti-Guaidó hashtags on Twitter. The random text appeared to be unrelated to Guaidó and to the hashtags. The network’s actions suggest they engaged in inauthentic behavior to make the hashtags seem more popular than they were in an attempt to influence or manipulate the trending topics on Twitter.

#AlertaVenezuela by Atlantic Council's DFRLab

Disinformation Venezuela
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Tue, Jan 28, 2020

#AlertaVenezuela: January 28, 2020

Accusations of corruption against Juan Guaidó and other National Assembly members resurfaced in the form of a misleading claim regarding the misappropriation of foreign funds that was pushed by pro-Maduro regime blogs and media outlets from Venezuela and regime-allied countries.

#AlertaVenezuela by Atlantic Council's DFRLab

Disinformation Venezuela

Fri, Jan 24, 2020

Infographic: Maduro’s Venezuela

Infographic by Atlantic Council

Venezuela

Thu, Jan 23, 2020

A year in, the United States still stands behind Venezuela’s interim government

As the interim government of Venezuela continues to fight for freedom and democracy against the regime of Nicolás Maduro, the United States is “unwavering in [its] commitment” to helping Interim President Juan Guaidó and the National Assembly, US Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Mark Green said on January 23.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Democratic Transitions Human Rights
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Tue, Jan 21, 2020

#AlertaVenezuela: January 21, 2020

On January 11, Juan Guaidó, president of the National Assembly who is recognized by more than 50 countries as interim president of Venezuela, announced his intention to appoint a presidential commission to oversee the restructuring of the Maduro regime-backed broadcaster Telesur. The announcement started the debate about the future of the media outlet. The regime mounted a significant response on social and traditional media, including on Telesur itself.

#AlertaVenezuela by Atlantic Council's DFRLab

Disinformation Venezuela

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

PeaceGame Venezuela: Pathways to Peace

A year after Juan Guaidó took the presidential oath, nearly sixty countries now recognize the interim government as the legitimate representative of the Venezuelan people. Still, the Maduro regime remains in power, further threatening the country and the world every day. As Venezuela becomes increasingly engulfed in internal strife, the international community must prepare for the most dire scenarios. What would be the reverberations of complete state collapse? How might various stakeholders— from Venezuelan actors to regional neighbors to Russia or armed groups—respond?

In-Depth Research & Reports by Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center

Crisis Management Democratic Transitions