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The Eurasia Center’s mission is to enhance transatlantic cooperation in promoting stability, democratic values and prosperity in Eurasia, from Eastern Europe and Turkey in the West to the Caucasus, Russia and Central Asia in the East.

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The Compatriots

As relations between the United States and Soviet Union fluctuated, New York City became a hub for Soviet and Russian activity, including diplomats, spies, and sympathizers alike. Russian journalists Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan trace the legacy Moscow has left behind in Manhattan streets and beyond.

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Thu, Feb 20, 2020

Russia loses leverage as Ukrainian exports go global

Russia was once Ukraine's all-dominant trading partner but six years of undeclared war between the two countries has dramatically reduced bilateral trade while forcing Ukrainian exporters to broaden their horizons.

UkraineAlert by Anders Åslund

Russia Trade

Tue, Feb 18, 2020

Russian escalation dampens hopes for peace in Ukraine

Russian hybrid forces in eastern Ukraine launched a series of artillery bombardments and localized advances early on February 18. What does this latest escalation mean for the already faint hopes of an end to the six-year conflict?

UkraineAlert by Peter Dickinson

Conflict Russia

Mon, Feb 17, 2020

Katz in Responsible Statecraft: How long can Russia and Turkey cooperate amid a myriad of conflictual hazards?

In the News by Atlantic Council

Europe & Eurasia Politics & Diplomacy

Fri, Feb 14, 2020

Flawed peace plan for Ukraine doesn’t pass muster

A distinguished international group of American, European, and Russian former government officials and think tank experts has taken advantage of the Munich Security Conference to issue a statement recommending twelve steps to bring greater security to Ukraine and the Euro-Atlantic region. For years, the Kremlin has tried to change the conversation on Ukraine, and they may have found their opening in Munich. In response, twenty-nine former US diplomats, government officials, and experts point out their errors.

UkraineAlert by Eurasia Center

Conflict Politics & Diplomacy

Thu, Feb 13, 2020

Nation-building Ukraine marks a year of Orthodox independence

Ukraine has recently marked one year of Orthodox independence. The country's religious landscape has yet to change dramatically, but the significance for Ukraine's nation-building journey cannot be overstated.

UkraineAlert by Peter Dickinson

Civil Society Russia

Thu, Feb 13, 2020

Putin forever: Ukraine faces the prospect of endless imperial aggression

Vladimir Putin's plans to change the Russian Constitution offer a strong indication that he intends to remain in charge of the country for the rest of his life. For Ukraine, this means coming to terms with the reality of endless imperial aggression.

UkraineAlert by Taras Kuzio

Conflict Russia

Thu, Feb 13, 2020

World must not forget Putin’s Crimean crime

When Vladimir Putin seized Crimea six years ago, he challenged the basic principles of international law. This should make Crimea a vital issue on the international agenda - but the occupied peninsula has long since disappeared from the headlines.

UkraineAlert by Suleiman Mamut

Conflict Non-Traditional Threats

Wed, Feb 12, 2020

Ullman in UPI: Politics of fear: China and Russia aren’t 10 feet tall

In the News by Atlantic Council

China Politics & Diplomacy

Wed, Feb 12, 2020

The Arctic is “not up for grabs,” Norwegian ambassador says

“The Arctic is changing, but our objectives remain the same: to secure peace and stability,” Norwegian Ambassador to the United States Kare R. Aas said on February 6. During keynote address opening the Atlantic Council’s “Looking North: Conference on Security in the Arctic,” Aas laid out Norway’s approach to the Arctic, noting that it takes its role as an Arctic state seriously.

New Atlanticist by Connor McPartland

NATO Northern Europe

Fri, Feb 7, 2020

The Yalta Conference at seventy-five: Lessons from history

One lesson is that core values may have more viability than it seems, especially in the long term: for two generations after 1945, foreign policy professionals and scholars concluded that Roosevelt’s weak defense of Poland at and immediately after Yalta was pointless (or cynical) and that the principles of the Atlantic Charter were inapplicable east of the Iron Curtain. Soviet domination there, it was implicitly (and sometimes explicitly) accepted, was forever. But it turned out otherwise. The Yalta Conference failed but Yalta Europe was not forever. The strategic vision that Roosevelt spelled out in the Atlantic Charter and sought to realize at Yalta—even if miserably—now seems the right one.

New Atlanticist by Daniel Fried

Central Europe Politics & Diplomacy