The Issues

Addressing climate change, migration, and security challenges—affecting all geographies—is more urgent than ever. There is a critical need to build resilience for individuals, communities, and institutions to better understand, prepare for, and withstand these interrelated threats. Together, we must act to ensure a secure and more prosperous world. While not all problems can be solved, the promise of progress rests in our willingness to address challenges head on.

Climate Change

The growing urgency of the here-and-now threats posed by climate change—demonstrated by rising instances and impacts of floods, droughts, famines, and other natural disasters—necessitates improving the ability of individuals, communities, and institutions to prepare for, navigate, and recover from disruptions. Building resilience to climate change risks will require developing a variety of tools for vulnerable people and communities, through partnerships with policymakers, the global NGO community and corporate leaders.

Migration

Whether driven by climate-related disasters, conflict, famine, or poverty, hundreds of millions of people are migrating within their regions or across the globe—with nearly 70 million people forcibly displaced from their homes today. We will help create the enabling conditions that allow for success in local and global efforts, using a variety of policy, financial and technological solutions, to address these challenges.

Security

Changes in our structural, natural, and digital environment are leaving individuals, communities, and institutions increasingly exposed to conflict, extremist attacks, and political instability. As a first step in addressing these challenges, leveraging existing, proven strategies from our research, we will help create and advance principles and programs aimed at reducing the drivers that erode our security.

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Experts

Content

Tue, Feb 18, 2020

Baughman McLeod joins TRT World to discuss effects of climate change on extreme weather and actions to take

In the News by Atlantic Council

Climate Change & Climate Action Energy & Environment

Mon, Jan 27, 2020

The potential global impact of the coronavirus outbreak

Beijing “must act" to contain the coronavirus outbreak, Miyeon Oh says, "especially in light of the indirect but potentially massive economic, social, and political impacts of the coronavirus in the region and around the world.” There is growing concern in Beijing as well, Robert A. Manning added, “that if this pandemic is only in its early stages, it could become the straw that broke the camel’s back for an already anemic economy.”

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

China International Markets

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

“Go forth and set the world on fire”

As the world rages around the raging fires, I have to wonder: Is this the moment where we will finally see the forest for the trees? Why are we continuing to look into a crystal ball, as if the climate crisis is somehow our future, when it’s so glaringly clear that it is our present?

Blog Post by Kathy Baughman McLeod

Australia Climate Change & Climate Action

Mon, Jan 6, 2020

Shaping the global future together: the Council’s “Top fifteen hits” of 2019

We look back at the Atlantic Council's top work of 2019 galvanizing US leadership alongside partners and allies to tackle the most pressing challenges confronting our nation and our world.

New Atlanticist by Frederick Kempe

Africa Americas

Thu, Dec 12, 2019

Baughman joins TRT World to discuss the climate crisis and Time Magazine’s decision to name Greta Thunberg Person of the Year

In the News by Atlantic Council

Climate Change & Climate Action Energy & Environment

Tue, Nov 5, 2019

Trump abandons US climate leadership with pact withdrawal

While a disappointment, the United States’ notification of intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement was already largely ‘priced in’ to political discourse and expectations. What matters most now is continued bold leadership—and hard, prosaic work—by the entities that have at least as much control over the future US emissions trajectory as the federal government.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Climate Change & Climate Action United States and Canada

Fri, Nov 16, 2018

Waiting for Eden Book Celebration & Launch of the Adrienne Arsht Center for Resilience Bookshelf

On November 16th, the Adrienne Arsht Center for Resilience launched its Resilience Bookshelf, which highlights prescient, compelling, and thought-provoking stories in which resilience is a central theme. Individual resilience lies at the heart of all the Bookshelf’s content, providing lessons for how to translate the concept of resilience into action against the range of major, […]

Event Recap by Adrienne Arsht Center for Resilience

Wed, Nov 14, 2018

The evolving wildfire threat: fewer, larger fires

While this year’s most intense fires have captured national attention as the largest, most destructive, and deadliest in California history, the total number of fires occurring annually in the United States has actually declined gradually in recent decades. 

New Atlanticist by Samuel Jeffrey

Resilience United States and Canada

Fri, Oct 12, 2018

Rapid intensification of hurricanes: A threat that requires resilient responses

A hurricane rapidly intensifying immediately before making landfall poses a unique and urgent threat. Systematically building resilience to account for these conditions—with hours, not days to prepare for a storm—is critical.

New Atlanticist by Samuel Jeffrey

Energy & Environment

Wed, Oct 10, 2018

Lessons from Hurricane Andrew

Although Michael stands to cause severe storm surges, wind damage, and loss of life, Florida’s resilient-by-design approach may aid the state in withstanding the storm and looking toward recovery.

New Atlanticist by Samuel Jeffrey

Climate Change & Climate Action