Experts

Samantha Sultoon

Visiting Senior Fellow, Global Business & Economics Program and Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security

Economic Sanctions Initiative Global Business & Economics Program

Content

Tue, Oct 15, 2019

Trump vs Erdoğan: It’s hard to bluff when your cards are on the table

It is hard to take seriously threats by the US government to ruin the Turkish economy when Trump himself gave this green light in the first place. Under such circumstances, sanctions have almost no chance of succeeding in putting this genie back in the bottle.

New Atlanticist by Brian O'Toole

Economic Sanctions Syria

Tue, Sep 24, 2019

Key Sanctions Risks and Trends

On September 19th, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business & Economics Program’s Economic Sanctions Initiative hosted an event alongside Kharon to discuss key sanctions risks and trends. Ambassador Daniel Fried, the Weiser Family distinguished fellow at the Atlantic Council, offered brief opening remarks to introduce the event’s topic and presenters.

Event Recap by Global Business & Economics Program

China Economic Sanctions

Fri, Sep 20, 2019

Iranian central bank designation: What does it mean?

The only appreciable impact of the September 20 designation will be to further impair the delivery of food and medicine to the Iranian people, who are already struggling to get needed supplies and to antagonize US partners around the globe.

New Atlanticist by Brian O'Toole

Economic Sanctions Iran

Thu, Sep 19, 2019

Secondary sanctions’ implications and the transatlantic relationship

The term secondary sanctions provokes strong reactions from allies and markets. Due to the power of the US dollar, breadth of the US market, and dominance of the US financial system, even the threat of secondary sanctions prompts many non-US companies to change their behavior to avoid the risk of such sanctions. Although this approach has furthered US policies, it has resulted in transatlantic political divergence and enhanced compliance uncertainty among private sector actors.

Issue Brief by Samantha Sultoon & Justine Walker

China Economic Sanctions

Mon, Aug 5, 2019

New Russia sanctions: Justified, but feeble and awkward

Muddied signals, weak sanctions, and uncertain rollout are no way to respond to Putin’s continuing misdeeds.

New Atlanticist by Daniel Fried, Brian O'Toole, and David Mortlock

Economic Sanctions Russia

Fri, Aug 2, 2019

Lift sanctions on Russia? Really?

This issue is simple enough: sanctions were imposed in response to aggression; sanctions can be lifted when and if that aggression ends.

New Atlanticist by Daniel Fried

Economic Sanctions Russia

Tue, Jul 16, 2019

Libra: Balancing Risks and Opportunities

Facebook has disclosed its plans to launch the ambitious new digital currency, Libra, in the first half of 2020. Operating on a version of blockchain, Libra hopes to become a widely adopted payment method, supported by Facebook's 2.4 bn users and a coalition of global corporations including Uber, Visa, and Spotify that form the Libra Association.

Event Recap by Global Business & Economics Program

Economic Sanctions Economy & Business

Mon, Jun 24, 2019

Trump sanctions Iran’s Supreme Leader

The executive order allows US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to impose sanctions on officials appointed by Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and those who provide material support to his office.

New Atlanticist by Ashish Kumar Sen

Economic Sanctions Iran

Tue, Jun 11, 2019

Sanctions Lunch with Brian Hook: Prospects for the United States’ Maximum Pressure Campaign on Iran

On June 11, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business & Economics Program’s Economic Sanctions Initiative hosted a roundtable discussion on the prospects of the United States’ maximum pressure campaign on Iran, featuring Brian Hook, US Special Representative for Iran and Senior Policy Advisor to the Secretary of State.

Event Recap by Global Business & Economics

Economic Sanctions Economy & Business

Mon, Jun 3, 2019

US Cuba policy: EU and Canadian firms to suffer?

On April 17 2019, US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announced an important change in the United States’ policy toward Cuba: Title III of the Cuban Liberty and Democracy Solidarity Act of 1996 (LIBERTAD Act) would no longer be suspended. As a result of this decision, US claimants can now seek compensation for property confiscated by the Castro government. The move has important implications for US and foreign companies doing business in Cuba. This edition of the EconoGraphic explains the history and purpose of the LIBERTAD Act, evaluates the policy’s potential impact on US allies’ economic interests in Cuba, and highlights its implications for the pressure campaign against the Maduro regime in Venezuela.

EconoGraphics by BY OLE MOEHR | GRAPHICS BY SHIQING HUA, FRANCIS AUBEE, AND NICK BROWN

Cuba Economic Sanctions