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Tue, Mar 24, 2020

The implications of the coronavirus crisis on the global energy sector and the environment

The current drop in oil demand—caused, in large part, by severe reductions in travel due to the coronavirus—combined with the Saudi-Russia oil price war has simultaneously, if temporarily, lowered greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). However, the drop in GHG emissions is likely to be unsustainable in the long term, and the currently low cost of oil has raised questions about the future of clean energy deployment and climate action.

New Atlanticist by Jennifer T. Gordon

Coronavirus Energy & Environment

Mon, Mar 9, 2020

Saudi Arabia and Russia feud over coronavirus oil response: Will everyone lose?

"While Russia’s decision last week not to support OPEC’s proposal for a production cut and the subsequent oil price war—which as of publishing has pushed Brent crude down more than 9 percent—is surely part of the larger story of the economic impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, it is actually better understood as a geopolitical story about how US energy production growth has strengthened the United States’ international posture, which in turn has reshaped a number of global relationships," Randolph Bell says.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Coronavirus Energy Markets & Governance

Tue, Mar 3, 2020

Coronavirus and the oil market: The effects thus far and what to expect next

The week of February 21 will be one the oil market won’t soon forget—one which exposed exactly how sensitive the prices are to the demand side of the market. Yet, while the possibility of a major supply correction remains in the cards, a longer-term correction to the oil price collapse of the past week will require a restoration of market confidence in economic growth and the future oil demand picture.

New Atlanticist by Reed Blakemore

Coronavirus Energy Markets & Governance

Reed Blakemore is deputy director at the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center, where he focuses on oil markets, geopolitical risk, and energy security. He is responsible for program development and strategy, as well as the GEC’s Global Energy 2050 modeling project and Shifting Gears: The Future of Transportation and the Geopolitics of Peak Oil Demand project.

Prior to joining the Atlantic Council, Reed held positions at the International Institute for Strategic Studies – US and the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He earned a master’s degree from the George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs in Security Policy Studies, with emphases in defense analysis and transnational security Issues. He received a bachelor’s degree in International Relations from the University of Redlands, where he was also a member of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honor society.