Events

Wed, Apr 8, 2020

Spheres of influence: Outdated relic or renewed reality?

ONLINE EVENT - Are spheres of influence a geopolitical force, and if so, how should US policymakers respond?

2:15pm

Thu, Apr 9, 2020

Is Ukraine’s negotiating position changing?

ONLINE EVENT - Ukraine is now in its sixth year of conflict and all parties claim they want peace. A controversial proposed peace agreement from Kyiv has not yet been signed. Why not, and what does Kyiv plan to do next?

12:30pm

All Content

Tue, Mar 31, 2020

Q&A: Where is President Zelenskyy leading Ukraine?

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy's surprise decision to dismiss his reformist government in early March raised fundamental questions over the future direction of the country. Atlantic Council experts explore what it could mean for Ukraine.

UkraineAlert by Adair Appleton and Adrian Hoefer

Democratic Transitions Ukraine

Mon, Mar 9, 2020

Saudi Arabia and Russia feud over coronavirus oil response: Will everyone lose?

"While Russia’s decision last week not to support OPEC’s proposal for a production cut and the subsequent oil price war—which as of publishing has pushed Brent crude down more than 9 percent—is surely part of the larger story of the economic impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, it is actually better understood as a geopolitical story about how US energy production growth has strengthened the United States’ international posture, which in turn has reshaped a number of global relationships," Randolph Bell says.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Coronavirus Energy Markets & Governance

Thu, Mar 5, 2020

Zelenskyy changes course with government reshuffle

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has launched a radical shake-up of his government just six months after it started work. New faces are out and experienced figures are in. What will this mean for the country's future trajectory and hopes for change?

UkraineAlert by Peter Dickinson

Democratic Transitions Ukraine

John E. Herbst is director of the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center. 

Ambassador Herbst served for thirty-one years as a foreign service officer in the US Department of State, retiring at the rank of career-minister. He was US ambassador to Ukraine from 2003 to 2006, when he worked to enhance US-Ukrainian relations, help ensure the conduct of a fair Ukrainian presidential election, and prevent violence during the Orange Revolution. Prior to that, he was ambassador to Uzbekistan (2000-03), where he played a critical role in the establishment of an American base to help conduct Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. He also promoted improved US-Uzbek relations, in part by encouraging the government in Tashkent to improve its human rights record.

In his last four years at the State Department, he served as the coordinator for reconstruction and stabilization, leading the US government’s civilian capacity in societies in transition from conflict or civil strife, and to provide support to countries at risk of instability. He oversaw the establishment of the Civilian Response Corps of the United States, the US civilian rapid response force for reconstruction and stabilization operations overseas.

Ambassador Herbst previously served as US consul general in Jerusalem; principal deputy to the Ambassador-at-Large for the Newly Independent States; the director of the office of independent states and commonwealth affairs; director of regional affairs in the Near East Bureau; and at the embassies in Tel Aviv, Moscow, and Saudi Arabia.

He most recently served as director of the center for complex operations at National Defense University. He has received the Presidential Distinguished Service Award, the Secretary of State’s Career Achievement Award, and the State Department’s Distinguished Honor Award. Ambassador Herbst has written book chapters, articles, and op-eds on stability operations in Central Asia, Ukraine, and Russia. His writings have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, the National Interest, and Foreign Policy. He has been a frequent guest discussing the Ukraine crisis on television and radio. 

Ambassador Herbst earned a bachelor of science in foreign service from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, Phi Beta Kappa, and a master of law and diplomacy, with distinction, from the Fletcher School at Tufts University. He also attended the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies Bologna Center.