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Tue, Dec 10, 2019

What the United States can learn from Europe on fighting cyberattacks and disinformation

If you want to deal effectively with cyber challenges then you need to address not just the computer part…but the political part as well, the human being behind the attack,” said Jonatan Vseviov, the Estonian ambassador to the United States.

New Atlanticist by John Burton

Disinformation European Union

Dr. Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer is director of the Institute for Strategic Research (IRSEM) at the French Ministry for the Armed Forces, after having served as Policy officer on “Security and Global Affairs” at the Policy Planning Staff (CAPS) of the French Ministry for Foreign Affairs (2013-2016). Trained in three disciplines—philosophy (Bachelor, Master, Ph.D.), law (Bachelor, LL.M., post-doctorate) and in political science (Ph.D.)—, he has held positions at the Faculty of Law at McGill University, Canada (2011-2013), at the department of War Studies of King’s College, London (2010-2011), at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University (2008-2009), at the French Embassy in Turkmenistan (2007-2008), and at the University of Montreal (2005-2007).

His is an auditor of the 68th national session on “Defense Policy” of the Institute for Higher National Defense Studies (IHEDN), a member of the Academic Advisory Board of the NATO Defense College, and a lecturer at Sciences Po and the ENS Ulm. He has received numerous awards, including the “Maréchal Foch” prize from the Academie francaise in 2013, and was selected as a Munich Young Leader at the Munich Security Conference in 2018.

The author of one hundred articles and almost twenty books, he published on international relations theory (notably on realism and Raymond Aron), collective security (UNSC, veto restraint), military interventionism (Libya, Syria, Ukraine), R2P, the law of armed conflict, the humanitarian debate on nuclear weapons (TPNW), remote warfare (targeted killings, armed drones, lethal autonomous weapon systems), international criminal justice (ICC, in particular in its relationship to Africa), “hybrid warfare”, information manipulation, human rights, totalitarianism, the Horn of Africa (Eritrea) and the recent mutations of the international order.