Events

Wed, Nov 20, 2019

Sub-national climate action: A view of the global landscape

Limiting the increase in global average temperature to 1.5°C is within reach—but only with action across all levels of government and all segments of society. Across the United States, cities, states, and communities are executing bold, ambitious plans to reduce national emissions, even in the absence of federal leadership.

9:30am Washington DC

Content

Thu, Nov 14, 2019

Livingston joins The World Today to discuss the historic flooding in Venice

In the News by Atlantic Council

Climate Change & Climate Action Energy & Environment

Tue, Nov 5, 2019

Livingston quoted in Axios on Saudi oil

In the News by Atlantic Council

Energy & Environment Energy Markets & Governance

Tue, Nov 5, 2019

Trump abandons US climate leadership with pact withdrawal

While a disappointment, the United States’ notification of intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement was already largely ‘priced in’ to political discourse and expectations. What matters most now is continued bold leadership—and hard, prosaic work—by the entities that have at least as much control over the future US emissions trajectory as the federal government.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Climate Change & Climate Action United States and Canada

Full Bio

David Livingston is deputy director, climate and advanced energy, of the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. 

He is also a fellow of the Initiative for Sustainable Energy Policy at Johns Hopkins University, and of the Payne Institute at the Colorado School of Mines. He also teaches a course on energy for the University of Southern California (USC) program in Washington, DC, and serves as a strategist for the Obama Foundation Scholars program.

Previously, Livingston served as a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and as the inaugural Robert S. Strauss fellow for geoeconomics at the Office of the US Trade Representative, where he concluded as acting assistant US trade representative for congressional affairs.

He also has worked at the World Trade Organization in Geneva and at the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) in Vienna.

Earlier in his career, Livingston was selected as a Future Energy Leader by the World Energy Council, and is an alumnus of the Atlantik Brücke Young Leaders Program.He earned a BA with highest honors from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and an MSc with distinction from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.