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Mon, Mar 30, 2020

Coronavirus and transatlantic security: Implications for defense planning

Once the West gains control over the coronavirus, NATO and its national defense establishments will have to conduct a hard-nosed assessment of the longer-term military implications and requirements that flow from the current reality—that pandemics can, within weeks, debilitate populations, sink economies, shutter borders, degrade military operations, and fragment unity among the closest of allies.

New Atlanticist by Christopher Skaluba and Ian Brzezinski

Coronavirus Crisis Management

Thu, Mar 12, 2020

Trump hits out against Europe in coronavirus speech: The transatlantic alliance suffers

“The golden rule of leading an alliance is consultation—don’t take your friends by surprise, especially when your actions target them,” Damon Wilson says. “This isn’t about being nice. This is about being smart advancing US interests. What happens the next time we need our allies?”

New Atlanticist by Atlantic Council

Coronavirus Economy & Business

Wed, Dec 4, 2019

Atlantic Council press call: Unpacking the NATO Leaders’ Meeting

On Wednesday, December 4, transatlantic leaders gather in London for the NATO Leaders' Meeting. Marking the 70th anniversary of the military alliance, the meeting is an opportunity to take stock of NATO’s progress over the last three major summits and discuss how to transform the Alliance for the future. The summit will come at a tense time for the Alliance, with allies divided over issues such as trade, burden-sharing, Syria, and Iran, while the meeting's host country will be only a few days away from a general election. Following the summit and rounding off NATO's historic 70th anniversary year, Amb. Alexander Vershbow, Chris Skaluba, and Andrew Marshall, discuss key takeaways from the Leaders Meeting and priorities for the NATO alliance moving forward.

Press and members call by Atlantic Council

NATO Security & Defense

Christopher Skaluba is an expert lecturer and writer on international relations, national security, and defense policy. After leaving his role as a senior executive in the federal government, Skaluba joined Syracuse University as an adjunct professor—teaching foreign policy as part of the team inaugurating the Executive Master’s in International Relations (EMIR) program in Washington. The EMIR partnership between Syracuse’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and the Center for Strategic and International Studies is the first advanced degree in international relations offered by a major research university in cooperation with a leading global think tank.

From 2001 to 2016, Skaluba served as a career civil servant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, rising from presidential management fellow to the Senior Executive Service. Immediately before leaving government, Skaluba served as the principal director for Strategy & Force Development. In this capacity, he was responsible for assessing the future of international security and crafting the Defense Department’s strategies for navigating that future in order to develop a prepared, capable, and effective US military. Prior to this assignment, Skaluba served as the acting deputy assistant secretary of Defense for Middle East Policy, the principal advisor to the Department’s leadership with respect to crisis management in the Middle East.

Skaluba served a lengthy tenure as the principal director for European & NATO Policy, where he formulated and implemented US defense policy for Europe. Accordingly, he conducted defense relationships with thirty-one European nations and, in the wake of  Russian revanchism, helped inaugurate the European Deterrence Initiative.In this capacity, and in his previous role and as the director for European Policy, Skaluba frequently represented the Secretary of Defense and the Department at bilateral, multilateral, and interagency negotiations associated with transatlantic security.

Prior to his work on Europe, Skaluba served in the Pentagon’s Policy Planning office, working primarily on long-term competitive strategy development and the Defense Policy Board. He also served on secondment to the United Kingdom Ministry of Defense where he managed London’s defense relations with Japan and South Korea. Before his assignment in Whitehall, Skaluba helped craft the Pentagon’s inaugural Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support. As a presidential management fellow, he completed developmental assignments at the US Mission to NATO and on Capitol Hill. His private sector experience includes completion of the Walt Disney Company’s management development program.

Skaluba is a graduate of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University where he earned a Master of Arts in International Relations. He also hold a Master of Arts in English (Cultural Studies) from Syracuse, where he taught numerous classes in writing and rhetoric while pursuing his degrees. He proudly holds a Bachelors’ degree in English and History from the Pennsylvania State University. Among his professional honors, Skaluba was twice awarded the Defense Department’s Medal for Exceptional Civilian Service, was chosen Leader of theYearby the staff of the Pentagon’s Policy organization, and honored with the Order of the Cross of theTerra Mariana by the Republic of Estonia.Skaluba has recently published multiple essays on foreign and defense policy in War on the Rocks.